Six Dalmatian pelicans equipped with satellite transmitters in Romania

Six Dalmatian pelicans equipped with satellite transmitters in Romania

A collaborative effort involving the Danube Delta National Research and Development Institute (INCDDD), the Romanian Ornithological Society (SOR), and the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve Administration (ARBDD) successfully fitted six Dalmatian pelicans with GPS-GSM satellite transmitters during late November and early December.

A joint team of the Danube Delta National Research and Development Institute, the Romanian Ornithological Society and the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve Administration.

Sebastian Bugariu

 

Patagial transmitters, mounted on the wings of both mature and immature pelicans, were utilised for this initiative. These devices, weighing only a few grams and powered by solar batteries, do not interfere with the birds’ activities. The project, a component of the Pelican Way of LIFE and Danube Free Sky initiatives, has the equipped Dalmatian pelicans currently located in various areas of the Razelm-Sinoe lagoon within the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve.

These transmitters furnish scientists with vital information on the birds’ frequented locations and activities, offering a more detailed understanding of individual movements and potential threats.

 

Patagial transmitters, mounted on the wings of both mature and immature pelicans, were utilised for this initiative.

Sebastian Bugariu

 

This marks the first instance in Romania where specialists have employed patagial transmitters, enabling frequent data transmission regarding bird location and activity. The acquired information aids specialists in formulating effective and targeted conservation measures to safeguard the Dalmatian pelican—a “Vulnerable” species on Romania’s Red List of bird species and “Near Threatened” globally.

The wealth of data, including the resolution and frequency of information transmitted by the devices, has progressively transformed our knowledge of bird migration, movement patterns, and habitat utilization over time.

 

Patagial transmitters, weighing only a few grams and powered by solar batteries, do not interfere with the birds’ activities.

Sebastian Bugariu

 

Fifteen years ago, the Romanian Ornithological Society and ARBDD also equipped five Dalmatian pelicans with satellite transmitters, contributing to the identification of crucial wintering sites along the Danube.

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